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 Sacred Objects and Symbols. The Synagogues of Greece”

The 12th Εphorate of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities in collaboration with the Jewish Museum of Greece, the Jewish Community of Ioannina and the Cultural Center of the Municipality of Ioannina, presented an exhibition of artistic photography by Samuel Negrin and Ioannis Panagakos, entitled:  Sacred Objects and Symbols. The Synagogues of Greece”.

The exhibition was hosted at the "Dione" room of the Ioannina Archaeological Museum and remained open from Monday, 14th March until Saturday, May 14th, 2011.
 
This photographic exhibition, entitled ‘Synagogues of Greece: Light and Shadows’, had first been presented in the Contemporary Art Gallery of the Jewish Museum of Greece, on May 9th, 2005.
 
The exhibition included twenty-three (23) black and white photographs, taken by Samuel Negrin and Ioannis Panagakos, who traveled throughout Greece, and captured with their cameras the particular atmosphere of the synagogues.Graduates of the School of Graphic Arts and Art Studies, of TEI of Athens, the two artists reveal through imaginative variations of light and shadow, the unearthly environment of these places of faith and worship, making the guests active participants in their calm and serenity.
 
The exhibition included photographs of the Synagogues of Ioannina, Athens, Thessaloniki, Chania, Larissa, Trikala, Rhodes, Veria, Chalkis and Corfu. Concerning Ioannina, an once thriving Jewish community, the hosting of this exhibition was of particular importance, because it was accompanied by authentic religious objects, on loan by the Jewish Community of Ioannina for the duration of the exhibition. Images from the life of the Jewish Community of Ioannina during the last century, as well as Sephardic & Romaniote hymns accompanied the exhibition material.
 
At the same time, the Cultural Center of the City of Ioannina organized events related to the subject of the exhibition.


The Holocaust of Greek Jews: The Persecuted and the Rescuers


The production of the exhibition “The Holocaust of Greek Jews: The Persecuted and the Rescuers” was funded by the Greek Ministry of Press and Media in 2000 and was presented, for the first time, in Strasbourg, City of Human Rights. It was presented in the building of the European Council, in February 2001, and received enthusiastic reviews.

The exhibition incorporated previously existing material, as well as the results of latest research. It was divided in 18 thematic units, with explanatory texts in both English and French and 170 photographs of artefacts, documents and other objects of the time, from the Museum's collection.

Besides relating the historic facts, the exhibition contains personal testimonies which bring the main participants of this drama to the foreground; simple people, whether persecuted Geek Jews or sympathising and assisting Christian compatriots.

The huge volume of material was divided in several panels, which were accompanied by a continuous projection of slides and flanked by three-dimensional objects of metal and wire. The combination made for an arresting impression.

The exhibition was also shown in Copenhagen, Denmark, (in March 2001 at the Old Fellow Palace, at the centre of the city), in Thessalonica, Greece (in June 2003 at the Foyer of the Royal Theatre), and finally in Athens, at the Megaron of Music, on January 27, 2004, as part of the ceremonies for January 27th, the first official National Day for Holocaust Remembrance.

The Jews of Greece: 2,300 Years of History and Tradition

The exhibition was presented as part of the 53rd Frankfurt International Book Fair, whose guest of honour for the year 2001 was Greece. The exhibition took place in September and November 2001, on premises of the Jewish Museum of Frankfurt.

The exhibition's aim is to present elements of the two diverse Jewish traditions that flourished in Greece: the Romaniote one, of Greek-speaking Jews who settled in Greece since the 3rd century B.C., and the Sephardic one, introduced by refugees from Spain in the 15th century. Besides history, the exhibition also explores other aspects of Jewish life, such as religious tradition and architecture, everyday life, costumes, private worship, professions, language, arts and literature. The material is accompanied by explanatory texts.

More than 55 original artefacts from the Museum?s collection are used to provide an authentic picture of this distinctive Mediterranean tradition. The exhibition also includes a continuous slide projection of pictures of Greek Jewish life in the 19th and 20th century together with a musical background of traditional songs from various Jewish Communities.


The Jews of Greece: 2,300 Years of History and Tradition

The exhibition was presented as part of the 53rd Frankfurt International Book Fair, whose guest of honour for the year 2001 was Greece. The exhibition took place in September and November 2001, on premises of the Jewish Museum of Frankfurt.

The exhibition's aim is to present elements of the two diverse Jewish traditions that flourished in Greece: the Romaniote one, of Greek-speaking Jews who settled in Greece since the 3rd century B.C., and the Sephardic one, introduced by refugees from Spain in the 15th century. Besides history, the exhibition also explores other aspects of Jewish life, such as religious tradition and architecture, everyday life, costumes, private worship, professions, language, arts and literature. The material is accompanied by explanatory texts.

More than 55 original artefacts from the Museum's collection are used to provide an authentic picture of this distinctive Mediterranean tradition. The exhibition also includes a continuous slide projection of pictures of Greek Jewish life in the 19th and 20th century together with a musical background of traditional songs from various Jewish Communities.


Hidden Children in Occupied Greece

The exhibition “Hidden Children in Occupied Greece” explores the issue of the hidden Jewish children during the Occupation, by means of sixteen stories of children from all over Greece, which represent a wide range of outcomes that these unfortunate “war children” experienced. After the great success of the original exhibition, the Jewish Museum decided to produce an easy to transport travelling form with a view to presenting it in various cities of Greece and abroad.

The new traveling version of the exhibition was shown on January 27th, 2005, at the Foyer of the Megaron of Music of Thessalonica, during the ceremonies for January 27th, the first official National Day for Holocaust Remembrance. The exhibition was shown in the city again, during the second Seminar for Educators, enriched with three new stories of hidden children. On January 30th 2006, it was presented at the Megaron of Music of Athens, during the ceremonies for the National Day of Remembrance of the Victims and Heroes of the Holocaust.

The Holocaust of Greek Jews, 1941-'44

This exhibition is based on original material and is the result of extensive research. It was first shown in Thessalonica, during the Second Seminar for Educators, in 2005, and at the Megaron of Music of Athens, during the ceremonies for the National Day of Remembrance of the Victims and Heroes of the Holocaust.

The exhibition examines the situation in Greece during the Occupation, its division in three zones of occupation held by Germany, Italy and Bulgaria. After relating the first anti-Semitic measures taken by the Germans in Thessalonica it tracks the events in chronological order, presenting the fate of Jewish Communities around the country, while also mentioning the few who escaped to the Middle East or to the mountains, to join the Resistance movement, and those who managed to hide, aided by compatriots of theirs. It also explores other aspects of the Holocaust, such as the concentration camps, the survivors, the Righteous of the Nations, and the state of the Jewish Communities that were reconstituted after the war.

Explanatory texts with rich informational material accompany the exhibition's many photographs.

Two JMG exhibitions on the Holocaust

The National Remembrance Day for Victims and Heroes of the Holocaust was honoured in an event organized by the Central Board of Jewish Communities in Greece, on 30th January 2006 at the Athens Megaron of Music. The Jewish Museum of Greece took part in the event by presenting two travelling exhibitions under the general title of "The History of the Holocaust in Greece". The presentation of these exhibitions was made possible thanks to the kind invitation of the Central Board of Jewish Communities in Greece and generous sponsorship by the Claims Conference Committee.
One of the exhibitions is entitled "The Holocaust of Greek Jews: The Persecuted and the Rescuers" and acts as an introduction to the events of 1941-1944. It presents the greater historical context that led to the displacement and extermination of thousands of our fellow citizens during the German occupation. The other exhibition is entitled "Hidden Children in Occupied Greece" and explores the theme of Jewish children who managed to survive in hiding in spite of tremendous danger. 
 

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