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  Historical and Ethnographic Temporary Exhibitions

Ι. In situ


2013

"Synagonistis: Greek Jews in the National Resistance"

On Tuesday, April 16th, 2013, the Jewish Museum of Greece inaugurated its new temporary exhibition, under the title “Synagonistis: Greek Jews in the National Resistance”, realized within the framework of a mutual program of co-operation with the Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany in Athens. Photographs, documents, letters, proclamations, resistance newspapers, original artifacts, weaponry and other relevant material will be presented to the public for the first time, trying to fulfil a sincere wish to honour those who fought and cancelled the belief that all Jews succumbed to the Holocaust “like lambs to the slaughter”. Thorough research that went on for five years resulted in the collection of 24 personal histories of men and women from various Jewish communities of Greece, who took up arms in the dark and harsh days of the Occupation. The exhibition will be accompanied by a bilingual catalogue while, director David Gavriilidis has produced a documentary film, which explores this subject engaging people, places and events. The permanent exhibition is also accompanied by specially designed educational programs for schools.

Exhibition duration: Tuesday, 16th April 2013 - Friday, 25th April 2014. Opening hours: Daily 09.00 – 14.30, Saturday: Closed, Sunday: 10.00 – 14.00.









2012

Raoul Wallenberg: Man Amidst Inhumanity

On Monday 22 October 2012, it was inaugurated in the Jewish Museum of Greece the temporary exhibition, entitled “Raoul Wallenberg. Man Amidst Inhumanity”. The exhibition is dedicated to the courageous Swedish diplomat, who saved the lives of tens of thousands of Hungarian Jews, during WW II, and was realised in cooperation between the Embassies of Hungary and Sweden in Athens.

Raoul Wallenberg, a descendant of a Swedish merchant family, arrived to Budapest in July 1944, four months after the German occupation of Hungary. Already in August of the same year, he issued under his diplomatic status 4.500 protective passports, which he had the Hungarian authorities accept as “family documents” and thus saving the lives of thousands of people. From the very beginning, he cooperated efficiently with the Red Cross, with the diplomats of neutral states and with Hungarian rescuers. Despite the dangers and the difficult internal political situation, Raoul Wallenberg although putting daily his own life at risk, he never stopped fighting for the salvation of his fellow humans.

As this year we commemorate the 100th anniversary of the birth of Raoul Wallenberg, the exhibition dedicated to him, has dual significance. Firstly to the honor life and the achievements of the Swedish Diplomat, but also to constitute an excellent example of humanity, respect for diversity and peaceful coexistence for the younger generations, in particular, today and because of the difficulties experienced by the country. The year celebration in memory of Raoul Wallenberg (2012) gives the opportunity to put concerns about important social issues of today, such as human values ​​and rights.

The exhibition  run until November 11, 2012
 

2008

 “Jewish Neibourhoods of Greece”

On May 2008 the Jewish Museum of Greece inaugurated the temporary exhibition “Jewish Neighbourhoods of Greece”.

This exhibition aims to explore several aspects of life in the Jewish neighbourhoods of Greece, mostly before the war. It makes no attempt to formulate any unique, sensational conclusion, just to let people from all over Greece speak for themselves about the neighbourhood they lived in as children or young adults, before the war and after its end.

They talk about their homes, their lives, entertainment and gatherings, holidays, games, stories, characters, family and friends, their relationships with neighbours, recollections, changes brought on by the war, and several other things they wished to share with us. Thus, the visitor is called upon to partake of familiar, timeless and universal stories, and to perceive a vivid, though of necessity partial, image of a way of life rich in traditions and human relations, of a world that the war destroyed forever.

The exhibition material includes photographs, texts and living testimonies recorded on camera. The twelve communities, on which neighbourhood stories and visuals were collected, are presented by alphabetic order. Besides the printed presentation, the exhibition includes a screen, where visitors can watch the people themselves tell their stories. Perhaps that will make them think of their own neighbourhoods…


2003

“Hidden Children in Occupied Greece”

September 2003 saw the opening of the exhibition “Hidden Children in Occupied Greece” at the Jewish Museum of Greece. The exhibition explores the subject of hidden Jewish children during the Occupation, through sixteen stories of youngsters from all over Greece.

The stories cover the wide range of experiences, developments and outcomes that these unfortunate wartime children suffered. Photographs, toys, a variety of household objects, exercise books and diaries from those hard years illustrate the details of the personal accounts and underline their authenticity.

The exhibition functioned as the focal point of a series of exhibitions, publications, events and educational activities on the same subject, which ran until the beginning of 2005, making this one of the most significant projects the J.M.G. has produced on the Holocaust.

 


2001

“Children's Images and Objects of the Century Past”

The exhibition “Children's Images and Objects of the Century Past”, a nostalgic look at infancy and childhood covering a period from the end of the 19th century till the 1950's, lasted from June 2000 until February 2001. The aim of the Jewish Museum was to stir emotions and memories, at the same time showing how the birth of a child is a source of joy and hope for all people, whose ways of celebrating it are similar the world over.

The Museum published appeals for the public to help by lending childhood objects of their own. As usual, the response of the Friends of the Museum was enthusiastic and it was soon inundated with family memorabilia, clothes, amulets, toys, furniture, copybooks and photographs, loaned in the name of loved ones. These comprised approximately half of the exhibition's content.

Since part of those objects belonged to children lost in the Holocaust, the exhibition served as a discreet memorial to their short lives and was dedicated by the JMG to their memory.
 

2000

“The Jewish Community of Volos”


The opening ceremony of the temporary exhibition of photographs and artefacts, “The Jewish Community of Volos” took place, at the Jewish Museum of Greece, on February 27th, 2000. The exhibition lasted until May 2001.











1999

“Photographs from the Jewish Community of Rhodes”


Photographs of the Jewish Community of the island of Rhodes were exhibited at the temporary exhibitions area of the Jewish Museum of Greece. The photographs were collected by Aaron Hasson, founder of the Jewish Museum of Rhodes. The exhibition opened in March 1998 and lasted twelve months.

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